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34 Mujeres X Oscar-CHI Take Logan Square

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

by Janeida Rivera,

Screenshot 2016-06-08 13.12.14National Boricua Human Rights Network Saturday March 26th, 34 Mujeres X Oscar congregated in Logan Square for their monthly rally to call for the freedom of Puerto Rican Political Prisoner Oscar López Rivera. This group, a collective of women that is an initiative of the National Boricua Human Rights Network, convenes monthly and chants and hold signs that demand Oscars release, asking cars passing by to honk in support, displaying their social media hashtags for the curious commuters, their 34 Mujeres X Oscar Chicago banner and Puerto Rican flags for each minute representing the length of years Oscar López Rivera has been incarcerated. Logan Square has received this group warmly and people who pass them, honk, raise their fists, shout affirming things and stop for more information about the Campaign to Free Oscar. Several local residents have volunteered to help distribute flyers. Screenshot 2016-06-08 13.12.23Men are welcome to join in support of this women-led monthly gathering and hold signs, collect petitions, chant or carry a banner and children are also welcomed to shake a maraca, dance, chant and participate as well! Please join us for our next 34 Mujeres X Oscar – CHI gathering on April 30, 2016 to have time to park, grab a flag, poster, maraca or flyers/petitions at 2:30PM and the event begins and ends promptly from 3:00PM to 3:34PM. Bring friends and family and let’s gather in the name of justice and peace! View a short video at http://bit. ly/34MujeresChiMarch2016 “Justicia y paz, ni un año mas!”

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Lin-Manuel Miranda: Give Puerto Rico Its Chance to Thrive

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

Screenshot 2016-06-08 13.01.59On Aug. 31, 1772, a hurricane devastated the island of St. Croix, the home of the teenage Alexander Hamilton. In a letter one week later, he described the force of the storm and the destruction it caused as “sufficient to strike astonishment into angels.” His letter included this plea for help for his countrymen: “O ye, who revel in affluence, see the afflictions of humanity and bestow your superfluity to ease them. Say not, we have suffered also, and thence withhold your compassion. What are your sufferings compared to those? Ye have still more than enough left. Act wisely. Succour the miserable and lay up a treasure in Heaven.” So vivid was his account of the disaster that the letter was published in a newspaper in the Virgin Islands, The Royal Danish American Gazette, and used to support relief efforts for the island. I’m invoking Hamilton’s words today, in this plea for relief for Puerto Rico. Much has been said about the dire economic situation pressing down on Puerto Rico. I am the son of Puerto Rican parents. What can I say to persuade elected officials and policy makers to act? What influence do I have to change the minds and hearts of those in Congress to put aside their differences and deal with the crisis confronting 3.5 million American citizens in the Caribbean? I’m not a politician or an economist. I’m a storyteller. More than 150 schools on the island have closed. San Jorge Children’s Hospital, Puerto Rico’s largest pediatric hospital, has been forced to close two wings and 40 rooms, and cannot afford to hire the nurses it needs. It’s estimated that a doctor a day leaves the island. Engineers, accountants, blue-collar workers and entire families are emigrating daily. According to the census, Puerto Rico has lost 9 percent of its population in the last decade, with 84,000 leaving last year alone. This is not the Puerto Rico I remember. Every summer my sister Luz and I stayed with our grandparents in Vega Alta, a small town on the northern coast. My grandfather managed the town credit union — a real-life George Bailey if ever there was one. My grandmother owned a travel agency, Viajes Miranda. My aunt Yamilla owned the school supply store next door, and I sold candy to returning students in August. In Vega Alta, I was “el nene de Luisito, que se fue a Nueva York” (“The son of Luisito, who left for New York”) but welcomed every summer as a cherished member of the community, despite my halting Spanglish. I walked from one end of town to the other, waving at the business owners, many of whom went to church with my grandparents, feeling a sense of community that often eluded me back in New York. Today, most of those storefronts — the school supply shop, the travel agency and many more — are boarded up, with little hope of housing new businesses. Residents like the town’s mayor, Isabelo Molina, and my uncle Elvin, who heads a Pentecostal church there, are working hard to change that. They have learned to stretch a dollar as far as it can go. But Puerto Rico’s $72 billion debt, which is equal to about 68 percent of the island’s gross domestic product, thwarts efforts for economic development. There are remedies when governments run up debt. If Puerto Rico were an American city, it could declare bankruptcy, as Detroit did in 2013. If it were a state, the federal government would surely have already declared emergency measures to help the most vulnerable. But since it is a territory of the United States, there is no system in place to handle the financial and humanitarian crisis that is happening right now. Please let us not get bogged down in Puerto Rico’s status. If a ship is sinking, you don’t ask, “Well, what type of ship is it and what type of ship should it be?” You rescue the people aboard. What Puerto Rico needs, as a first step, is what almost any other company or government has — the ability to restructure its debt. Congress can make that happen. The island is in danger of defaulting on some of its larger loans and it is already being sued by creditors. An act of Congress in support of restructuring would help bring creditors to the table to develop a workable plan that could satisfy debtholders and relieve the punishment of the people of Puerto Rico. This is not a Republican issue. This is not a Democratic issue. This is an American issue. When 3.5 million of our citizens face the consequences of financial collapse, we should act. Because Puerto Ricans can vote neither for the president nor for congressional representatives, it falls to us of Puerto Rican heritage in the continental United States to amplify their plea. By chance, I picked up Ron Chernow’s biography of Alexander Hamilton in 2008 and found the inspiration that changed my life. I recognized, in Hamilton’s ability to write his way out of his difficult circumstances, a kindred spirit. I write about Puerto Rico today just as Hamilton wrote about St. Croix in his time. Congress, please don’t play politics with the lives of 3.5 million Americans. Succor the miserable and lay up a treasure in heaven. We are counting on you.

Lin-Manuel Miranda is a composer, librettist, actor and the creator of “Hamilton” and “In the Heights.” This article originally appeared in the New York Times, March 28, 2016

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PUERTO RICAN ELECTED OFFICIALS DEMAND ACCOUNTABILITY FROM U.S. CONGRESS

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

by Kevin Garcia, PRCC Staff

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On Wednesday, March 19th, Congressman Luis V. Gutiérrez, Ald. Roberto Maldonado and other Puerto Rican elected officials held a press conference at the Museum of Puerto Rican Arts and Culture to discuss the Puerto Rican fiscal and humanitarian crisis. Gutiérrez demanded the U.S. be held responsible for debt that has affected Puerto Rico and its citizens. He and Maldonado spoke about the legislation enacted by Congress in 1984, which denied bankruptcy for Puerto Rico’s municipal governments, agencies and bureaus. Under U.S. law, cities and towns can file for bankruptcy, but states and territories can’t; Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory. Ald. Gilbert Villegas, Ariel Reboyras and Commissioner Luis Arroyo Jr. spoke briefly at the press conference. ASPIRA of IL Board Chair Fernando Grillo and PRCC ED José E. López also participated. Jessie Fuentes, Puerto Rican Agenda co-chair, emceed. Over 60 members of the Puerto Rican Agenda, the Puerto Rican Cultural Center and activists attended the event.

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Conference to Host Stateside Puerto Ricans Act Against Humanitarian Crisis On The Island Of Puerto Rico

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

NEW YORK, NY – As the crisis in Puerto Rico intensifies, one group remains under reported by media and scholars alike: stateside Puerto Ricans. The number of United States based Puerto Ricans continues to increase on the heels of the crisis, and today more Puerto Ricans (5,266,738 million) live stateside than on the island. Yet little is known about the true social, economic and political implications of the crisis on this community. To demonstrate the scale and impact of the Puerto Rican crisis on the stateside community and the rest of the nation, on April 22 and 23 the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Screenshot 2016-06-08 12.27.38Hunter College, CUNY, will host stateside Puerto Ricans. Policy makers, scholars, religious and community leaders, as well as other Puerto Ricans and their allies from across the nation, will come together to map out solutions for the future. “The Puerto Rican population needs to be treated as a whole; we are 8.6 million people as one and we need to begin to understand our collective power. Only by seeing ourselves under one singular identity can we make the most progress as a people. Together, we can generate the strongest response to the crisis on the island in political spaces and create viable alternatives,” said Congressman Luis V. Gutiérrez, who will be joining the April event. A range of other key voices including Congressman José Serrano, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez, New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Illinois State Senator Iris Y. Martinez, New York State Assemblyman Marcos Crespo, Counselor to the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Antonio Weiss, labor leader Dennis Rivera and journalist Juan González, among others, will come together to take a deep dive into topics like civil rights and political participation, environment and community development, education, healthcare and more. Monseñor Roberto González Nieves, who was born in New Jersey and is today Archbishop of San Juan, will be speaking on the crisis stateside for the first time. Screenshot 2016-06-08 12.29.13“Puerto Rico is facing one of its most critical challenges in its history,” said Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. “We’re seeing medical professionals leave the island, people are losing their jobs and the healthcare system is negatively impacted. The federal government has to let Puerto Rico restructure its debt. The current crisis is affecting 3.5 million on the island and for many living stateside as well. This is a humanitarian crisis. We need to stand in solidarity with the people in Puerto Rico, and it is critical that our voices are heard. There is still much work to be done, and that’s why we need to continue to drum up support here in the U.S. and on the island. We are more powerful together, and together we will be a voice for justice that cannot be ignored.” The event expands on several events in Florida and Washington, D.C. and throughout the rest of the country that have addressed the economic crisis on the island, focusing on its implications to the rest of the nation. “Partly as a result of the dire situation of friends and families in the island, and partly due to the challenges posed by the reshaping of the stateside Puerto Rican communities, the Puerto Rican diaspora has engaged in a solidarity movement unprecedented in our history. This is a new activism, an emergence of new civic and political leaders that we haven’t seen before. We are offering up our space, our research and knowledge about stateside Puerto Ricans to advance the understanding of the economic, fiscal and unfolding humanitarian crisis in support of the active engagement of our community in finding solutions to such historical challenges,” concluded Edwin Meléndez, Director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, CUNY, the leading think taScreenshot 2016-06-08 12.29.21nk on Puerto Ricans in the United States. The event is free and open to the public. Those interested in participating should RSVP at https:// www.eventbrite.com/e/puertoricopuertoricanstickets. Contact Suset Laboy and Maria
Laboy via email at Lalaboypr@Lalaboypr.com or phone at (212) 772-5692 for additional information.

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LARES CELEBRATES 40 YEARS AT FOREFRONT OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

by Hugo Teruel, LARES Director

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Over the past 40 years, the Latin American Recruitment and Educational Services Program (LARES) has been a think tank for Latinos in higher education at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Operating on a mission of innovation, activism and leadership has produced alumni that have gone on to be great contributors to our community. LARES has been instrumental in not only making sure that doors of opportunity for Latino students are open at UIC, but that students are successful in finishing their college degree. Students see LARES as a home away from home, a space where cultural, emotional and social ills that Latino students face are understood, navigated and surmounted. LARES has always provided that sense of belonging to students and challenge students to their maximum potential. The LARES 40th Anniversary Summit held March 7th with UIC students, faculty, staff, community partners and external institutions reinforced the mission and vision that LARES embodies. The Summit panel recounted the historical importance and legacy that the LARES program has left on many individuals, our community and the university. Notable presenters at the Summit included UIC Chancellor, Dr. Michael Amiridis; Cook County Commissioner Jesus “Chuy” Garcia; Congressman Luis Gutiérrez; Dr. Leonard Ramirez, Former Director of LARES; Ada López, Former University of Illinois Board of Trustee, José López, Executive Director of the Puerto Rican Cultural Center and Deborah Santiago of Exelencia in Education. Each presenter recognized the tremendous critical and intentional efforts and services that LARES has provided throughout the years in the areas of recruitment, admission, academic advising and retention of Latinos at UIC. As we move forward, LARES will continue to develop strategies that are effective to Latino students and continue to collaborate with internal and external partners to foster successes for Latino students. For more information contact LARES at (312) 996-3356.

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From Division Street “Riots” ‘66 to the founding of UIC LARES ‘75

Posted on 07 March 2016 by Kevin Garcia

Ian Torres, Latino Cultural Center Student Educator

The Union for Puerto Rican Students (UPRS) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) kicked off the 22nd annual Pa’Lante conference on Monday, April 11 with a panel on the 1966 Division Street “riots” and the formation of the Latin American Recruitment and Educational Services (LARES) program at UIC in 1975. The invited panelists included Linda Coronado, forScreenshot 2016-06-08 11.52.00mer recruiter and advisor for LARES and former commissioner of the Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Latino Affairs under the Harold Washington administration; José E. Lopez, executive director of the Puerto Rican Cultural Center and professo
r at UIC, Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) and Columbia College; and Michael Rodriguez- Muñiz, Provost’s Postdoctoral Scho
lar at the University of Chicago. Michael Rodriguez-Muñiz provided a historical overview of the riots and the relationship between politics and students in the 1960s. Linda Coronado spoke about the activism that organized the Mexican community, in particular in Pilsen and NEIU, and how organizing strategies led to the creation of Benito Juarez and Roberto Clemente high schools and LARES. Professor José E. Lopez discussed the ways Mexican and Puerto Rican communities cooperated to create the Rafael Cintron Latino Cultural Center and LARES at UIC. All three panelists emphasized the intersectionality of community organizing, the urgency for developing programs in higher education for Mexican and Puerto Rican students in the late 60s and 70s and highlighted the importance of the development of the Latino/a consciousness through unity among Lati
no/a and other cultures. On Wednesday, April 13th the conference continued with poet, writer and educator Rich Villar. Mr. Villar spoke about his experience as a Puerto Rican poet in the United States and how writing shaped his eScreenshot 2016-06-08 11.51.48xperiences and life. He presented work from his book, Comprehending Forever, and examined Puerto Rican literature as a form of resistance. On Friday, April 15th the 22nd Annual Pa’lante Conference came to a close with Dr. Yarimar Bonilla, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. Her presentation touched on the current fiscal crisis in the island and the statehood party in Puerto Rico. Through her research she looks at similar cases in the Caribbean and Latin America and their effects. The 22nd annual Pa’Lante conference was organized by UIC students and members of the student organization Union for Puerto Rican Students together with the UIC Chancellor’s Committee on the Statues of Latinos (CCSL), LARES, the UIC Rafael Cintrón Ortiz Latino Cultural Center (RCOLCC), the Latin American and Latino Studies Program (LALS) and the PRCC.

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E ola, e ola, e ola n? kini e!* Kekuni Blaisdell

Posted on 06 February 2016 by Kevin Garcia

by L. Alejandro Molina,

National Boricua Human Rights Network The National Boricua Human Rights Network and the Puerto Rican Cultural Center extend their deepest condolences on the passing of Dr. Richard “Kekuni” Blaisdell, exemplary educator, historian and visionary activist in the struggle for Hawaiian Independence. I was privileged to coordinate Ka Ho’okolokolonui K?naka Maoli – Peoples’ International Tribunal Hawai’i 1993 of which Dr. Richard “Kekuni” Blaisdell was the convenor. He later visited Chicago with a contingent of Kanaka Maoli (indigenous Hawaians), which were the Honorary Marshals in the 1994 Screenshot 2016-06-08 10.41.36 Peoples Parade. Over the course of twelve days in August 1993, the United States and the state of Hawai’i were put on trial for crimes against the original people of Hawai’i, the K?naka Maoli, by the People’s International Tribunal Hawai’i. This panel of international judges was convened to hear charges of genocide, ethnocide, the taking of the Hawaiian sovereign government and the destruction of its environment. Kekuni was deeply committed to the struggle of the Puerto Rican people for independence and in support of freedom for Puerto Rican political prisoners. Kekuni was an unforgettable man who strove to meet his historical responsibility at an extraordinary moment in the struggle for Hawaiian independence- the centennial commemoration of the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani and the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1993. We first met at the 1992 International TriScreenshot 2016-06-08 10.41.43bunal of Indigenous Peoples and Oppressed Nations in San Francisco entitled “USA on Trial”, as part of the resistance against the quincentennial celebrations of the Columbian Expedition. During the Tribunal, the representatives of the Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement testified before a panel of international jurists on their struggles- culturally, environmentally and and politically. The Tribunal also heard from other freedom struggles in the US, in particular the Puerto Rican. We developed a long and fruitful relationship based on solidarity, helping the Hawaiian contingent at the 1993 UN Human Rights Conference in Vienna, Austria, and then helping to coordinate the Peoples International Tribunal. Along the way, we began to discuss the possibility of uniting representatives of the island/nations invaded by the US in 1898. Several meetings of the “1998 Working Group” took place in Chicago and Hawaii, and a possible book was planned, but events, capacity and priorities changed and so did our collective plans. *All Hawai’i Stand Together

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Johnny Tirado Remembered: “We Got This!”

Posted on 02 February 2016 by Kevin Garcia

by Jessie Fuentes,

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National Boricua Human Rights Network As we all know Johnny was an artist, a good cook, and quite comedic, but he was also an activist, educator, partner and father figure to many. Johnny always challenged the people around the Puerto Rican Cultural Center to be better, to reflect and to not forget the greater mission at hand. If you know anything about the PRCC you know we love to get people right into the work – Johnny genuinely cared about the development of new activist and the development of our pedacito de patria. Who remembers how stressed out we would be during a Pancake/Waffle events? Johnny would wave his spatula and say “We got this.” How can we forget Johnny’s fluffy pancakes; outside of wanting Oscar to be free it is why people showed up. I remember being in meetings with Johnny and learning the entire Nuestro Tambo album because he just left rehearsal. His humming, tapping, singing and love for life always made people around him appreciate the work we were doing. His creativity as Michelle would describe, came out of nowhere. He was a perfectionist, he believed that everything we put out had to be our best work and rightfully so. Johnny didn’t just do political work because he believed in the cause rather he believed that a collective group of people can produce REAL change when strategic, careful and thoughtful. Johnny could convince you that you were capable of doing anything because for him all that mattered is what you wanted to do; if you liked it he loved it. Right before Carlos Alberto’s release I remember clearly the feeling of not knowing if we had won the battle, but again Johnny would ensure you that “we got this.” Johnny your presence, activism and support taught us many things – how to appreciate the small victories, how to be patient, how to love our comrades, and how to work hard even when it feels like we have nothing else to give. Your departure teaches us another lesson – that the work we do matters because it is from this work we have built a family, meaningful relationships and a collective passion to work towards a more just world. On behalf of NBHRN, good bye for now companero!

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Carlos Claudio: A New Kind of Judge Justice from the Community, for the Community

Posted on 02 February 2016 by Kevin Garcia

By La Voz staff,

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In 1992, the Illinois State Legislature established the Cook County Judicial Subcircuits. They were created to ensure more diversity on the bench by having judges elected from the different neighborhoods in Chicago. One of those subcircuits is the 6th, a diverse district with a large Latino presence that includes the neighborhoods of Humboldt Park, Logan Square, West Town, Hermosa and others. In this subcircuit, an important race has caught the attention of many stakeholders. Carlos Claudio, whose parents were born in Puerto Rico, is the only Latino with a contested race in the 6th subcircuit. He already has the support of the majority of Latino elected officials on Chicago’s North Side. Endorsements include: Congressman Luis Gutierrez, Senator Iris Martinez, Representative Luis Arroyo, Sr., Cook County Commissioner Luis Arroyo Jr., Alderman Roberto Maldonado, Alderman Carlos Ramirez-Rosa, Alderman Ariel Reboyras, Alderman Milly Santiago, and Alderman Gilbert Villegas. Carlos was born and raised on Chicago’s Northwest side, in the Bucktown and Hermosa neighborhoods, and graduated from Kelvyn Park High School. As an undergraduate, Carlos first attended Wright College, one of the City Colleges of Chicago, where he was elected President of the Student Government Association. He then transferred to DePaul University, where he completed his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. At De- Paul, Carlos was elected president of DePaul’s Alliance for Latin American Empowerment, a student organization that highlighted the importance of diversity in higher education and worked to provide assistance to underserved communities. In addition, he, along with other student activists, was instrumental in the formation of DePaul’s Latino Cultural Center. He went on to earn his juris doctorate at DePaul University College of Law, where he received the Mayor’s Leadership Scholarship and served as the Student Bar Association’s Diversity Representative. Carlos began his career as an Assistant State’s Attorney in one of the busiest courtrooms in Chicago, where he prosecuted countless DUI cases and quickly rose to become first chair, a title given to attorneys who are in charge of their courtrooms. Later, in the State’s Attorney’s Juvenile Abuse and Neglect section, Carlos focused on ensuring the safety and security of children who had been endangered by abusive or negligent parents or guardians. While at the State’s Attorney’s Office, Carlos witnessed first hand the inequities facing so many families coping with the justice system in Cook County. “Growing up I was always drawn to the legal profession. I thought a courtroom was the great equalizer, the one place where no matter what the circumstances, fairness and accountability would always prevail. I believed justice was truly blind. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Too many times we see the inequities that exist in our society manifest themselves in our judicial system,” said Claudio. Knowing that the judicial system was failing his and other communities throughout Cook County, Carlos decided to start his own private practice where he consistently took on pro bono work focused on both civil and criminal matters. Now he is running for judge with the same passion and commitment that he has displayed throughout his career. “Our community has always had to fight for justice. My race is an extension of that. I want to represent and give a voice to the countless people from our neighborhood that feel disenchanted with our judicial system. Because for far too long we have had to endure with a heavy heart the injustice that happens around us. That is why it is important that we elect judges that transcend social biases and are willing to hold themselves to the highest standards while pursuing justice. It is with those values as my guiding principles that I will proudly represent my community,” said Claudio. Carlos lives in Logan Square with his wife Marina, a family physician in private practice on the north side, and their 11-year-old daughter.

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Cobra fuerza Luis Gutiérrez y exige libertad para Puerto Rico

Posted on 02 February 2016 by Kevin Garcia

El demócrata rechazó que la junta de control fiscal sea la solución. El congresista demócrata Luis Gutiérrez envió un mensaje contundente al gobierno federal, donde exigió que libere a la Isla y desfavoreció la creación de una junta federal de control fiscal. Las expresiones fueron vertidas en el hemiciclo de la Cámara de Representantes de Estados Unidos, en un espacio que sirvió a Gutiérrez para expresar su sentir sobre el futuro del País. Screenshot 2016-06-08 10.29.40En su mensaje de poco más de cinco minutos, Gutiérrez habló de varios temas, entre los que se encuentran las leyes de Cabotaje, el sistema de salud, el potencial de desarrolló económico de la isla y la deuda actual del gobierno, cuya cifra asciende a los $69 mil millones en bonos. “Liberen a Puerto Rico para que pueda resolver el problema de su gran deuda sin estar esposada por el Congreso, su distante y desatento amo colonial.Liberen a Puerto Rico para que sus hospitales puedan permanecer abiertos para padres y madres enfermos y sus escuelas permanezcan abiertas para los niños. Nadie debe temer que su casa se queme porque los bomberos no han sido pagados”, expresó el congresista. Además, habló sobre la respuesta del Congreso a la deuda del País y solicitó atención seria para encontrar el camino para que el país “no sea ni absuelto de sus obligaciones ni herido mortalmente por ellas”. Criticó también que “Puerto Rico está siendo asfixiado por la Ley Jones – una ley aprobada aquí en esta sala sin ningún tipo de consulta con el pueblo de Puerto Rico – que dice que, por ley Puerto Rico no puede comparar precios para la mejor oferta de carga”. Según Gutiérrez, el País cuenta con los recursos suficientes para sustentarse de alimentos.”Tenemos que permitir que Puerto Rico pueda crear una economía agrícola que permita que los puertorriqueños puedan alimentarse”, abundó. Sobre la junta de control fiscal aseguró que esta no debería ser una opción para Washington. “Imagínate. Una isla que no puede determinar su propio destino, que tiene que jugar un juego económico con todas las reglas amañadas en contra de ella – ¿cuál es la solución en Washington? Quitarle lo poco que le queda de autonomía y añadir un nuevo nivel de control de Washington sobre la colonia”, añadió. Al final de su mensaje, el congresista recordó que “los problemas de Puerto Rico tomaron mucho tiempo para crearse pero tengo absoluta confianza en la capacidad del pueblo de Puerto Rico a resolverlos”. Tomado de El Vocero.com – 02/11/2016

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